GTAC Advisory Board


The GTAC Advisory Board consists of leading life sciences and education experts who are dedicated to increasing student interest and literacy in science. They strengthen our reputation as leaders in life science education through facilitating linkages to the wider Research and Development sector and by providing support services and advice that enrich our practice.

 

Prof-Suzanne-Cory-publishProfessor Suzanne Cory

AC PhD FAA FRS

Chair (Appointed: August, 2001)

Professor Suzanne Cory is one of Australia's most distinguished molecular biologists. She was born in Melbourne, Australia and graduated in biochemistry from The University of Melbourne. She gained her PhD from the University of Cambridge, England and then continued studies at the University of Geneva before returning to Melbourne in 1971 to a research position at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research. From 1996 to 2009 she was Director of The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and Professor of Medical Biology at The University of Melbourne. She is currently an Honorary Distinguished Professorial Fellow at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute. Her research has had a major impact in the fields of immunology and cancer and her scientific achievements have attracted numerous honours and awards. She was President of the Australian Academy of Science from 2010 to 2014 and serves on a number of councils and boards in Australia and overseas.

 

Dick-Strugnell-publishProfessor Dick Strugnell

Deputy chair (Appointed: August,2001)

Richard (Dick) Strugnell is a molecular microbiologist who completed his PhD at the Alfred in 1985 on the pathogenesis of experimental syphilis. He left for the UK on a CJ Martin Fellowship in late 1986 and spent three years split between the Wellcome Research Laboratories at Beckenham Kent, working with Gordon Dougan, and the Birmingham University School of Life Sciences, working with Charles Penn, on research that focussed on the use of Salmonella Typhimurium as a vaccine “vector”, ie. engineered to carry antigens from other pathogens as a live vaccine. Dick returned to Monash Microbiology at Clayton in 1989. After two years at Monash Clayton, Dick took up an independent academic position at the University of Melbourne, commencing as a Senior Lecturer in 1991. He was promoted to Associate Professor and Reader in 1999 and Professor in 2001.

His research has focussed on the molecular basis of bacterial pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the intersection between pathogen and the mammalian immune system, both adaptive and innate. He has studied Salmonella Typhimurium for the last 25 years was a co-organiser of the 3rd ASM (USA) International Meeting on Salmonella in Aix in 2009. He was also member of the CRC for Vaccine Technology for 13 years, the last 7 as Deputy Director under Anne Kelso, where he developed an interested in structured research training, the addition of allied skills training to the central and fundamental research project during the PhD. His time is split between University administrative responsibilities as Pro Vice Chancellor (Graduate and International Research) and running a research laboratory in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Melbourne in the new Doherty Institute. His research is funded by the NHMRC under Program Grant support, and the ARC.

Dick has been Member of the GTAC Board of Management since the Board was constituted

 

Heather-Thompson-publishHeather Thompson

(Appointed: July, 2015)

Heather is the principal of the University High School. Heather has been an educator for almost 30 years.  Starting her career in rural Victoria as a Humanities Teacher, Heather taught in both Echuca High School and Benalla College.  After 12 years of classroom teaching, Heather moved into a Consultant/Project Officer role with the Department of Education’s Western Metropolitan Region in the areas of Teaching and Learning and Performance and Accountability for five years.  For the last decade, Heather has been the Campus Principal of Copperfield College (2005-2006), Acting Principal of Buckley Park College (2012) and the Assistant Principal of The University High School (2007-2015). She is presently the Vice-President of The Victorian Association of Secondary School Principals (VASSP).  Heather completed a Masters Degree in Educational Leadership at The University of Melbourne in 2009. A keen musician, Heather has also tutored violin for Melbourne Youth Music and has played in orchestras over the last 14 years.

 

Bredan-crabb-publishProfessor Brendan Crabb

AC, PhD

(Appointed: August,2001)

Professor Brendan Crabb AC  is the Director and CEO of Burnet Institute and Immediate-Past President of the Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes (AAMRI). He is Chair of the Victorian Chapter of AAMRI. Professor Crabb is a molecular biologist with a particular interest in infectious diseases and in health issues of the developing world. His personal research is the development of a malaria vaccine and the identification of new treatments for this disease.

He is the current Chair of the US-based Malaria Vaccine Science Portfolio Advisory Committee, the oversight group for the major malaria vaccines under development. He is also Chairman of Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct (AMREP) Council, Chairman of the PATH/Malaria Vaccine Initiative Science Portfolio Advisory Committee in the US.

Professor Crabb holds Professorial appointments at The University of Melbourne and Monash Universities and is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences. Until his appointment as Director of the Burnet Institute he was a Senior Principal Research Fellow of the National Health & Medical Research Council of Australia, and an International Research Fellow of the US-based Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

He serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards of the Sanger Institute’s Malaria Program and the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Science. Professor Crabb was the Editor-in-Chief of the world’s leading parasitology research journal the International Journal for Parasitology from 2006 to 2009 and remains on its editorial board along with that of Nature Communications and F1000 Reports.

He was awarded a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) in the 2015 Australia Day Honours for his contributions to medical research and global health.

 

Ms Cheryl Power

(Appointed: January, 2008)

 

Tony-Bacic-publishProfessor Tony Bacic

BSc (Hons), PhD, FAA

(Appointed: January, 2013)

Professor Tony Bacic is Director of the Plant Cell Biology Research Centre at the School of Botany, University of Melbourne. Internationally recognized as a leader in plant biotechnology, his research is focused on the structure, function and biosynthesis of plant cell walls and their biotechnological application. His focus also includes the application of functional genomics tools in biological systems. He holds a Personal Chair in the School of Botany.  He was Director of the Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute at the University of Melbourne from 2008 – 2015.

Tony is Deputy Director of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls and Program Leader of the team at the University of Melbourne. He is Platform Convenor of the NCRIS-funded Metabolomics Australia, and is on the Management Committee of Bioplatforms Australia Ltd. He is a current Board Member of the Royal Botanic Gardens (Melbourne). He is a James Cook University Outstanding Alumnus (2010) and a La Trobe University Distinguished Alumnus (2013).

 

Dr-Ruth-Kluck-publish-2Dr Ruth Kluck

BSc, PhD

(Appointed: February, 2014)

Dr Ruth Kluck is laboratory head and ARC Future Fellow in the Molecular Genetics of Cancer Division at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, where her main focus is the biochemistry of apoptotic cell death. Following PhD studies at the University of Queensland, she undertook postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Don Newmeyer in San Diego, where she discovered that pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins act by blocking mitochondrial permeabilisation. Continuing this work in Melbourne, her group has made major advances in understanding how Bak and Bax form pores in mitochondrial membranes, including the symmetric dimerisation model of Bak and Bax oligomerisation.

 

David-Clarke-publishProfessor David Clarke

PhD, MSc, DipEd

(Appointed: June,2014)

David Clarke is Director of the International Centre for Classroom Research (ICCR) and Professor in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education (MGSE). For 20 years, his research activity has centred on studying classroom practice through a program of international video-based classroom research, most notably through the internationally-renowned Learner’s Perspective Study. The ICCR provides the focus for collaborative activities among researchers from more than 20 countries. More recently, Professor Clarke has led the development of the Science of Learning Classroom, a world-leading research facility at the University of Melbourne for the controlled study of classroom learning and a key component of the Science of Learning Research Centre (SLRC), established in partnership with the Queensland Brain Institute and the Australian Council for Educational Research. Professor Clarke’s extensive research publications address teacher professional learning, metacognition, problem-based learning, assessment, multi-theoretic research designs, cross-cultural analyses, curricular alignment and discourse in and about classrooms internationally.

 

Haidi-BadawiHaidi Badawi

BSc (Hons), DipEd, MEd

(Appointed: March 2016)

Haidi is a Molecular Biologist and Primary Connection Science Coordinator. She is leading the Science, Sustainability and Academic Improvement programs at the Australian International Academy of Education. Haidi is also a PhD Candidate in the area of Molecular Phylogenetics at The University of Melbourne. Haidi completed a Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership at The University of Melbourne in 2012.

Haidi has four registered patents in science innovation and has been awarded several international and national awards in the areas of Science and teaching innovation including an Endeavour Language Teacher Fellowship (Australian Government), Visiting Scholar at Flinders University (2007 - 2010), the Ron Cockcroft award for international recognition in wood research (2010) and first positions in MILSET organization-France on Mediterranean countries (2001), Best scientific invention on Egyptian universities (2000) and International scientific research for Mediterranean countries (2000).

 

Andrew-Nash-advisory-boardAndrew Nash

Senior Vice President, Research, CSL Limited

(Appointed: May 2016)

Andrew Nash completed his PhD in immunology at The University of Melbourne in 1988 and, after moving to the Centre for Animal Biotechnology in the Faculty of Veterinary Science, developed and led a research group focused on basic and applied aspects of cytokine biology. In 1996 he joined the ASX listed biotechnology company Zenyth Therapeutics (then Amrad Corporation) as a senior scientist and subsequently held a number of positions including Director of Biologicals Research and Chief Scientific Officer.  In July of 2005 he was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Zenyth, a position which he held up until the acquisition of Zenyth by CSL Limited in November 2006.  Following the acquisition he was appointed as CSL’s SVP, Research and is currently based at the Bio21 Institute where he leads a large global effort focused on the discovery and development of new protein-based medicines to treat serious human disease.